Tag Archives: reggae music

E&B World Music Showcase

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Happy International Women’s Day! It’s been a perfect day for listening to an assortment of African music. #musicfriendsofTenaciousM enjoy!

Prophets of Da City (POC) is a hip hop crew from Cape Town, South Africa. They are composed of about eight members, though the exact membership fluctuates frequently; these include Ishmael Morabe (vocals), Mark Heuvel (dance), Shaheen Ariefdien, Ramone and DJ Ready D. Their style uses elements of hip hop music, reggae and traditional African rhythms. Their albums include Our World (1990), Boom Style (1992), Age of Truth (1993), Phunk Phlow (1994), Universal Souljaz (1995), and Ghetto Code (1997). They are currently signed under the independent record label Ghetto Ruff. Credit: Wikipedia

Nomfusi was born in the township of KwaZhakele in the Eastern Cape. Her single mother, Kwazibani (“Who Knows?” in English) raised her while her father languished in jail for 21 years. A domestic worker by day, Kwazibani was a sangoma (African medicine woman) with a gift for music. Nomfusi would accompany her mother to the weekly sangoma rituals (“Intlombe”) where Nomfusi would develop her musicality by dancing and singing for hours. Today she is a two time SAMA nominee, Metro FM Award nominee and has multiple local and international tours under her belt. Credit: Wikipedia

Sonny Okosun (January 1, 1947 in Enugu, Nigeria– May 24, 2008 in Washington DC) was a musician from Nigeria. His surname is sometimes spelled Okosuns and first name Sunny. He was one of the leading Nigerian musicians from the late 1970s to mid ’80s.

His first band, The Postmen, was formed in Enugu in 1965. In 1969 he joined Melody Maestros, a band led by Victor Uwaifo. From 1972 to 1974 he led a group known as Paperback Limited and then formed a new band, Ozziddi. From then on, he released several albums either with Ozziddi, or solo recordings.

His 1977 song, “Fire in Soweto”, became a major international hit. He was featured in the anti-apartheid album Sun City, and his song “Highlife” was in the soundtrack of 1986 film Something Wild. His mainstream success started to fade in the late 1980s, but he continued his career as a gospel musician under the name Evangelist Sonny Okosun

He died aged 61 on 24 May 2008 at Howard University Hospital, Washington DC. His musical styles ranged included reggae, highlife, Afro-funk and gospel among others. He made music in the Edo language, Igbo language, Yoruba language and English. Credit: Wikipedia

E&B World Music Showcase

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Robert Nesta Marley OM (6 February 1945 – 11 May 1981) was a Jamaican singer-songwriter who achieved international fame through a series of crossover reggae albums. Starting out in 1963 with the group the Wailers, he forged a distinctive songwriting and vocal style that would later resonate with audiences worldwide. The Wailers would go on to release some of the earliest reggae records with producer Lee Scratch Perry. After the Wailers disbanded in 1974, Marley pursued a solo career which culminated in the release of the album Exodus in 1977 which established his worldwide reputation. He was a committed Rastafarian who infused his music with a profound sense of spirituality. Wikipedia


Tarrus Riley (born Omar Riley, 26 April 1979, Bronx, New York, United States is a Jamaican American reggae singer, member of the Rastafari movement and the son of Jamaican reggae singer Jimmy Riley. Wikipedia


William Alexander Anthony “Bunny Rugs” Clarke (6 February 1948 – 2 February 2014), also known as Bunny Scott, was the lead singer of Jamaican reggae band Third World as well as recording as a solo artist. He began his career in the mid-1960s and was also at one time a member of Inner Circle and half of the duo Bunny & Ricky. Wikipedia